Course Descriptions

English

 English I  1 credit
 Grade 9  N/A pds/wk

This introductory English course combines the study of literary genre with a focus on composition skills. Students will learn effective communication skills by focusing on the 6 + 1 Traits of writing developed by the Northwest Regional Education Laboratories. Oral communication and research skills are included.

 English II  1 credit
 Grade 10  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: English I  

This intermediate English course combines the study of world literature along with a continued focus on composition skills. Students will read, reflect, synthesize, and respond to several different types of world literature. A research paper is a requirement.

 English III  1 credit
 Grade 11  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: English II  

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." ~ Declaration of Independence

This course explores American literature and the pursuit of the American Dream. Students will go on a pilgrimage of religion and faith, relive a revolution of rebellion and conformity, redefine truth and human potential, and develop a deeper sense of self. Through students' explorations of classic American themes and ideals, they will deepen their awareness of political and social influences that have shaped American culture as it is known today. Selections of literature range from fiction (poetry, short stories, novellas, drama) to nonfiction (speeches, sermons, letters, journals, news articles). Students will not only think about literature and its connection to their lives, but they will learn to question it.

 English IV  1 credit
 Grade 12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: English III  

This is a class that will prepare students for the skills they will need to be successful in college and in life. When they have completed the class, students will have acquired the reading and critical thinking skills necessary for understanding challenging new material, analyzing that material to deduce meaning, and applying what they have learned to our world. They will have the composition skills needed to communicate their understanding effectively to a variety of audiences. Students will read and analyze classic works of literature because these works contain literary qualities that merit study and provoke thinking, not because of requirement to know a particular work or author. They will also look at modern and contemporary works as they examine all genres: plays, short stories, poetry, essays, and novels. Students will learn to apply critical literary terms as tools for learning, understanding, and communication. Learning activities include close reading, paraphrasing, discussions, essays, short answer exams, research papers, reflective journals, web quests, oral presentations, and others. The unit structure below identifies the main headings of the units only. Most units will include a combination of genres and activities. The structure to the class is not based upon a sequence of chronology, national origin, or genres. It is instead based upon the sequence that best supports the learning needs of the student.

 AP English Language/Comp.  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

The academic objectives of this course adhere to those outlined by the College Board in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in Language and Composition. AP Language and Composition explores the relationship between what authors say and how they are trying to say it. The literary component of the course provides a range of genres, including nonfiction, fiction, drama and poetry, and in the analysis of these works students are exposed to the analysis of both style-the more language-based approach to exploring meaning-and rhetoric-the analysis of author argument and structure.

 AP English Literature/Comp.  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This is a college level class that ultimately prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in May. In addition, it provides students with other skills associated with the most advanced classes in high school English, including research skills. When the class is complete, students will have acquired the reading and critical thinking skills necessary for understanding challenging new material, analyzing that material to deduce meaning and applying what is learned to the world.

 Grammar and Composition  1 credit
 Grades 9-12 (remediation course)  N/A pds/wk

This course is designed for the student who needs extra help in mastering communication skills and the fundamental principles of grammar and usage. The course focuses on teaching the composition concepts in the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing pioneered by the Northwest Regional Education Laboratories.

 Creative Writing  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

Creative Writing focuses on the four-step Process Writing model and the reading of professional writings to motivate students to create original essays, poems and short stories. The writing assignments include narration, definition, process analysis, cause and effect and comparison/contrast. Students learn self-editing skills by following the instructor’s detailed suggestions for the revision and refinement of their work.

 Journalism  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

The basics of journalism, including laws and ethics, freedom of the press and the principles of journalistic writing, are powerful tools. In this course, learn how to generate story ideas, conduct an interview and then put it all together into both news and sports stories. An introduction to feature writing and editorials is included.

Mathematics

 Algebra I  1 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

The purpose of this course is to allow the student to gain mastery in working with and evaluating mathematical expressions, equations, graphs, and other topics in a yearlong algebra course. Topics included are real numbers, simplifying real number expressions with and without variables, solving linear equations and inequalities, solving quadratic equations, graphing linear and quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, linear patterns, linear systems of equality and inequality, simple matrices, sequences, and radicals. Assessments within the course include multiple-choice, short answer, or extended response questions. Also included in this course are self-check quizzes, audio tutorials, and interactive games.

 Algebra II  1 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: Algebra I  

In this course students will use their prior knowledge from previous courses to learn and apply Algebra II skills. This course will include topics such as functions, radical functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, geometry, conic sections, systems of equations, probability, and statistics. Students will apply the skills that they learn in this course to real world situations.

 Geometry  1 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: Algebra I  

The Geometry course is a comprehensive look at the study of geometric concepts including the basic elements of geometry, proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, the coordinate plane, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, trigonometry, congruence and similarity, surface area, volume and transformations.

 Trigonometry  0.5 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

Trigonometry and the related real world applications of trigonometric topics are examined. After students complete this course they will have an understanding of how trigonometry is used in day to day life and how it relates to other mathematical topics.

 Pre-Calculus  0.5 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This course is designed to go through the major topics of Pre-Calculus and to prepare students to move on to Calculus. After completing this course students will understand polynomial functions, polar coordinates, complex numbers, conic sections, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, sequences and series.

Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry must be paired during the same school year.

 Calculus  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This course introduces limits, differentiation, and integration of functions. Students will find and evaluate finite and infinite limits graphically, numerically, and analytically. They will find derivatives using a variety of methods including The Chain Rule and Implicit Differentiation. They will use the First Derivative Test and The Second Derivative Test to analyze and sketch functions.

 Integrated Math  1 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

Students will build mathematical skills that will allow them to solve problems and reason logically. Students will be able to communicate their understanding by organizing, clarifying, and refining mathematical information for a given purpose; students will use everyday mathematical language and notation in appropriate and efficient forms to clearly express or represent complex ideas and information.

 AP Calculus AB  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This is a college level course that prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in May. The course introduces limits, differentiation, and integration of functions. Students will find and evaluate finite and infinite limits graphically, numerically, and analytically. They will find derivatives using a variety of methods including The Chain Rule and Implicit Differentiation. They will use the First Derivative Test and The Second Derivative Test to analyze and sketch functions. Each unit contains exam preparation content for the AP Calculus AB exam.

 AP Statistics  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

AP Statistics data analysis is dependent on the use of technology. Students should have access to computers that include software capable of doing data analysis and students will be required to interpret output generated by statistical software programs. Students are not expected to learn how to use various statistical programs.

Science

 Physical Science  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

Physical science is the introductory course to high school science courses and beyond. Students will expand on their middle science experiences to prepare them for biology, chemistry, and physics. This course will emphasize scientific thinking as a way of understanding the natural phenomenon that surrounds us. In addition, there will be both simulated and real world laboratory experiences to further expand your scientific horizons.

 Earth Science  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

This introductory Earth Science course incorporates the body of knowledge and facts accumulated from people’s observations of the Earth around them and the skies above them. This observed information of the earth has evolved over centuries into the branch of science known as earth science. Earth science has several different branches of study: the solid earth (geology); the earth’s waters (hydrology and oceanography); the earth’s atmosphere (meteorology); and the universe beyond earth (astronomy). Using careful observation and experimentation, students will learn to effectively analyze and evaluate the earth’s natural phenomena and their causes, as well as, its relationship in the universe by focusing on the four major areas of study.

 Environmental Science  .5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

Environmental Science is a multidisciplinary field that draws from all the sciences in addition to other fields. This course will help students better understand the relationship between humans and the world in which we live. Environmental science applies the principles of pure sciences such as biology, chemistry, ecology, geology, and others.

 Biology*  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: Geo-Environmental Science-Option I or II  
 * Accepted for Biology I, Option I only.

This course is an introduction to general biology and to the processes of scientific inquiry and thinking. It will include the fundamental principles of living organisms including physical and chemical properties of life, cellular organization and function, the transfer of energy through metabolic systems, cellular reproduction, the classification of living things, the six kingdoms of life will be examined. The main focus is to present biological information in an understandable and straight forward way that will capture the students’ interest dealing with up to date principles and concepts.

Chemistry*  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: Biology I – Option I, Elementary or Intermediate Algebra or Algebra I
 * Accepted for Applied Chemistry only.

This course adheres closely to standards for the teaching of chemistry. It emphasizes the mathematical, theoretical and experimental basis of modern chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the use of theoretical and mathematical concepts to explain and predict chemical behavior. An overview of the significant learning objectives that are presented in this course include Measurement, Atomic Structure, Chemical Bonding, Conservation of Matter, Stoichiometry, Gases, Acids and Bases, Solutions, Chemical Thermodynamics, Reaction Rates, Chemical Equilibrium, Organic Nomenclature, Biochemistry, and Nuclear chemistry.

 Physics  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

The goal of physics is to describe the physical world using a small number of basic assumptions, concepts, and equations. In this course, emphasis is placed on relating physics to the everyday world. Students explore the concepts involved with motion in one-dimension and two-dimensions, forces, work and energy, momentum and collisions, circular motion, and gravitation.

 AP Biology  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: Geo-Environmental Science Option II or III, Biology I Option II or III, and Chemistry I or Honors Chemistry I

This course is a comprehensive analysis of general biology that includes biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, mechanisms of evolution, evolutionary history of biological diversity, plant and animal form and function, and ecology. The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors or pre-medical students their first year. The textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, discussion topics and kinds of labs done in this course are equivalent to those taking this course in college. College Board guidelines are followed in determining the course.

 AP Environmental Science  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite: GeoEnvironmental Science Option II or III, Biology I Option II or III, and Chemistry or Honors Chemistry I

This course is designed to acquaint you with the physical, ecological, social, and political principles of environmental science. The scientific method is used to analyze and understand the interrelationships between humans and the natural environment. The course shows how ecological realities and the material desires of humans often clash, leading environmental degradation and pollution. The course consists of six chapters covering the following topics: Earth’s Systems, Human Population Dynamics, Natural Resources, Environmental Quality, Global Changes, and Environment and Society. Chapters are divided into several subsections, each of which contains text, animations, laboratory simulations and video presentations by experts.

 AP Chemistry  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 or Honors Chemistry

Advanced Placement Chemistry is equivalent to a full-year introductory college course in general Chemistry. Student will learn fundamental analytical skills to logically assess chemical problems proficiently. Through fascinating and elaborative lessons, students will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions based on informed judgment and present evidence in clear and persuasive essays.

 AP Physics B  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisites: Physics or Honors Physics

AP Physics is a yearlong introduction to the algebra-based major areas of physics – mechanics, fluids, waves, optics, electricity, magnetism and modern physics (atomic and nuclear). Students learn to think like scientists: making predictions based on observations, writing hypotheses, designing and completing experiments, and reaching conclusions based on the analysis of data derived from these experiments. Students apply the concepts of physics to their everyday experiences.

 Astronomy  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe. This course introduces students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development; basic scientific laws of motion and gravity; the concepts of modern astronomy; and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system; the Milky Way and other galaxies; and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students examine the life cycle of stars; the properties of planets; and the exploration of space.

 

 Great Minds in Science  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

Is there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can the global warming problem be solved? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, the scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on ten of today’s greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow’s world.

 

 Criminology  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

In the modern world, many citizens share a concern about criminal behaviors and intent. This course introduces students to the field of criminology, the study of crime. Students look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological perspectives; explore the categories and social consequences of crime; and investigate how the criminal justice system handles criminals and their misdeeds. The course explores some key questions: Why do some individuals commit crimes while others do not? What aspects of culture and society promote crime? Why are different punishments given for the same crime? What factors—from arrest to punishment—help shape the criminal case process?

Social Studies

American History  1 credit
 Grade 9  N/A pds/wk

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of American History. He content will focus on the origins of the nation’s democratic principles and continue through present day domestic and foreign issues that affect American society. There will be a particular emphasis on the individuals and groups that have not only been impacted by the nation’s development but those who have made contributions as well. Students will utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills as they participate in interactive discussions, and complete assignments establishing real-world connections.

 

 World History  1 credit
 Grade 10  N/A pds/wk

This course is a survey of world history from prehistoric to contemporary times. Students will learn about the socio-economic, political, and ideological conditions of various time periods as they study historical events and cultural achievements of world regions. Using primary and secondary sources, they will utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills as they conduct inquiry-based research, participate in interactive discussions, and complete assignments establishing real-world connections.

 

 American Government  0.5 credit
 Grade 11  N/A pds/wk

American Government is the study of the historical backgrounds, governing principles, and institutions of the government of the United States. The focus is on the principles and beliefs upon which the United States was founded and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. The principles of popular sovereignty, separation of powers, checks and balances, republicanism, federalism, and individual rights will be examined as will the roles of individuals and groups in the American political system. Students will compare the American system of government with other modern systems and assess the strengths and problems associated with the American system.

 Civics  0.5 credit
 Grade 11  N/A pds/wk

Civics can be expressed as a study in citizenship and government. This course will provide the learner with a basic understanding of civic life, politics, and government; a short history of its foundation and development, what rights the American government guarantees its citizens, and a survey of the duties and responsibilities American citizens must exercise in order to maintain their government. It will introduce the workings of our own and other political systems as well as the relationship of American politics and government to world affairs.

American Government and Civics must be paired during a student’s junior year.

 Sociology  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This course offers a study of human relationships in society. Additional emphasis is placed upon culture, social structure, the individual in society, societal institutions and social inequality.

 Psychology  0.5 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

The purpose of this course is to investigate why human beings think and act the way they do. This is an introductory course and will broadly cover several areas. Students will be expected to expand and go further into the topics. Theories and current research will be presented for the student to critically evaluate and understand. Each unit will present the terminology, theories and research that are critical to the understanding of the topic. Assignments and assessments will be included as well as tutorials and interactive drills.

 World Religions  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

Throughout the ages, religions from around the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taoism. Students trace the major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course also looks at some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examines the connections and influences they have.

 International Business  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

From geography to culture, global business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course helps students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in the global marketplace. It takes a global view of business, investigating why and how companies go international, and how they are more interconnected. Students gain an understanding of how economic, social, cultural, political, and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations are also explored. The course helps students cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in 21st century business activities.

 Economics  0.5 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

Economics is the study of how societies use limited resources to satisfy their unlimited wants and needs. It is the foundation of this course as students learn how fundamental decisions about the four factors of production; land, labor, capital, and entrepreneurship are made. Key topics covered include: law of supply and demand, saving, borrowing, and spending, the Federal Reserve System and the money supply, and the role of government in an open market economy.

 Social Problems I & II  1 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

Students become aware of the challenges faced by social groups as they learn about the complex relationship among societies, governments, and the individual. Each unit focuses on a particular social problem, including racial discrimination, drug abuse, the loss of community, and urban sprawl, and discusses possible solutions at both individual and structural levels. Students learn more about how social problems affect them personally, and begin to develop the skills necessary to help make a difference in their own lives and communities, as well as globally.
Social Problems I & II must be paired during the same school year.

 Contemporary World Issues  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

 

Students analyze governments, economies, peoples, and cultures from around the world in this course. Instruction emphasizes the structures and policies of the United States and how they compare to other systems in the international community. Students apply critical thinking and research skills to examine current events and contemporary issues, including human rights, the strengths and weaknesses of globalization, America's role in the international economy, the severe environmental threats facing many regions around the world today, how religion is often used to facilitate and justify violence, and America's "War on Terror" and its impact on the Middle East and Islamic culture.

 Anthropology  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

This course presents a behavioral science that focuses on the study of humanity and culture. Students learn the foundations of the five main branches of anthropology including physical, social, linguistic, archeological, and cultural. They are provided the opportunity to apply their observational skills to the real-life study of cultures in the United States and around the world. act on the Middle East and Islamic culture.

 Archaeology  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

George Santayana once said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” The field of archaeology helps us better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped shape our modern world. This course focuses on the techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted, as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Students also learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.

 Law and Order/Legal Studies  0.5 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

Every purchase, lease, contract, marriage, divorce, arrest, crime or traffic violation places the citizen face to-face with the law. Law & Order is designed to provide students with an understanding of their legal rights and responsibilities.

 AP European History  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This course is the study of the social, economic, cultural, intellectual, political and diplomatic history of Modern Europe and its place in the history of the world from the fall of Constantinople to the fall of the Berlin wall and the Soviet Union. The course will be taught at a level and rigor equivalent to that required of students in a college freshman or sophomore Modern European History course.

 AP Macroeconomics  0.5 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

Macroeconomics is an emphasis on how the economic system works as a whole. Students study how the economy is measured by using concepts such as gross domestic product (GDP) and other indicators. They examine concepts such as inflation, unemployment, world trade patterns, and the role of the Federal Reserve Bank.

 AP Microeconomics  0.5 credit
 Grades 11-1  N/A pds/wk

Microeconomics emphasizes how individuals make choices with limited resources. Students will examine concepts such as supply and demand, factors of production, roles of labor and management, the relationship between the environment and the economy, and the impact of the government on individual decision making processes. Students study the stock market as an investment option and trace various stocks through the semester using the Wall Street Journal and the Internet as resources.

 AP Psychology  0.5 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This course is a survey of psychology that introduces students to the major topics of the field, the terminology and methodology of psychology, and the historical and current understanding of human behavior and thought-processes. Students learn to analyze human experiences like psychologists do and to apply what they have learned to the world around them. The focus of the course is to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Psychology course administered by the College Board in the spring of each year.

 AP US History  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

Students explore and analyze the economic, political, and social transformation of the United States since the time of the first European encounters. Students are asked to master not only the wide array of factual information necessary to do well on the AP® Exam but also to practice skills of critical analysis of historical information and documents. Students read primary and secondary source materials and analyze problems presented by historians to gain insight into challenges of interpretation and the ways in which historical events have shaped American society and culture. The content aligns to the sequence of topics recommended by the College Board and to widely used textbooks. Students prepare for the AP Exam.

 AP US Government  0.5 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This course will survey the complex subjects of U.S. Government and politics. The processes and institutions through which the political system and policy decisions are made and this analysis will include the Constitutional structure of Government, participatory politics, the formal institutions of power, the extra constitutional influences on those institutions, and public policy and individual rights and liberties.

 AP World History  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

AP World History covers the history of the world from 600 C.E. to the present with an introduction unit on the period before (covering around 8000 B.C.E. to 600 C.E.). The course emphasizes “patterns of change” and the connections between the various world cultures throughout the time period being studied. Students will gain an understanding of the global experiences of humanity and be able to apply that knowledge to their growth and development as “world citizens”. The class has two major goals: (1) to prepare students to be successful on the AP World History exam and (2) to provide students with an understanding on why the world developed the way it did.

World Languages 

 French I & II  1 credit each
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

French has been carefully designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for a method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.

 French III & IV  1 credit each
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This course helps the student continue learning the French language by building on the beginning level French courses. Students listen, speak, read, and write through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. Students learn to express themselves using present, past, future, and conditional-tense verbs, articles, adjectives and increasingly complex grammatical structures. The course is aligned to the national Foreign Language standards.

 German I, II & III  1 credit each
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

German meets the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) which calls for a method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.

 German IV  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This fourth year of German builds upon the first three levels. Students will continue to sharpen their reading, writing, and listening skills as well as learn skills to think critically and express themselves on topics relevant to German culture. This fourth level will include authentic texts, current culture, and literature from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.. Cultural topics include: contemporary and classical music, expressing opinion, German history, transportation, family weekend travel, free time activities, youth and technology, multiculturalism, holidays, education, career, and travel in a foreign country.

 Japanese I  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

Japanese I has been carefully designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for a method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Each unit embodies all of these standards in accordance with the theories described in this document. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture to ensure that the student meets all standards. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams. Learning activities in each unit are focused upon a specific theme.

 Japanese II  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prequisite:Japanese I  

Japanese II has been carefully designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for a method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Each unit embodies all of these standards in accordance with the theories described in this document. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture to ensure that the student meets all standards. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams. Learning activities in each unit are focused upon a specific theme.

 Latin I  1 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/w

Latin I is an introduction to the basics of Latin grammar to help develop the skills necessary to translate basic sentences from Latin to English and English to Latin, and for reading simple connected passages of Latin prose and poetry. Learn how verb conjugations and noun declensions work in a highly inflected language, how to analyze the structure of Latin sentences and translate English sentences into well-formed Latin equivalents. Begin to read connected excerpts from ancient authors. Learn how verb conjugations and noun declensions work in a highly inflected language. Analyze the structure of Latin sentences and translate English sentences into well-formed Latin equivalents. And begin to read connected excerpts from ancient authors.

 Latin II  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite:Latin I  

Latin II is the continuation of Latin grammar and a deeper study of Roman Mythology and history. The grammar in Latin II reviews topics from Latin I with expanding use of declensions, adjectives, adverbs, and cases. These skills will be used to translate longer Latin texts to English that require more knowledge of grammar rather than just vocabulary recall. The course also incorporates an in-depth study of The Odyssey, the underworld, the rulers and kings of Rome, and entertainment.

 Mandarin Chinese I  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

This is a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of Mandarin Chinese (simplified). In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the Chinese speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to national Foreign Language standards.

 Mandarin Chinese II  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk
 Prerequisite:Mandarin Chinese I  

This course is a continuation of a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. Throughout the five units of material (daily routine, animals, hobbies, the body, and descriptions), students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary, present tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the Chinese speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national Foreign Language standards.

 Spanish I, II & III  1 credit each
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

Spanish unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture to ensure that the course meets the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for a method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.

 Spanish IV  1 credit each
 Grade 12  N/A pds/wk

This fourth year of Spanish is a continuation of the first three years. The student will continue to sharpen listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. Throughout the units of material, students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the Spanish speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories.

 AP French Language  1 credit
 Grade 12  N/A pds/wk

During 2010 this course will be rewritten to prepare students to demonstrate their level of French proficiency across three communicative modes, and the five goal areas outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities). In addition this course will be written to meet the tentative requirements of the new 2012 College Board AP French exam. AP French Language should advance both fluency and accuracy in language use and not overemphasize grammatical accuracy. To achieve this goal, the course will be presented and taught in almost 100% French. The course will teach language structures in context and focus on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Culture is an important component of the course and students will explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives.

 AP Spanish Language  1 credit
 Grade 12  N/A pds/wk

During 2010 this course will be rewritten to help prepare students to demonstrate their level of Spanish proficiency across three communicative modes (Interpersonal [interactive communication], Interpretive [receptive communication], and Presentational [productive communication]), and the five goal areas outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities). These standards aim to develop students “who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in a pluralistic American society and abroad.” In other words, “Knowing how, when, and why to say what to whom.” In doing so, the AP Spanish course will have at its foundation instructional content and practices that will connect students with the world in an authentic context that develops and yields communicative competence.

 Career & Technology

 Accounting  1 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

Through this course, students will gain a foundation in the skills needed for college accounting courses, office work, and managing their own small businesses. These skills are necessary for any student planning to major in Business in college. In this Introduction to accounting, students who have never had prior accounting training are given an overview of the three forms of accounting: financial, cost, and management accounting. The course helps build an appreciation for the role of accounting in managing a profitable business. It covers the basic concepts, conventions and rules of the double entry system. It introduces techniques to analyze ratios from the balance sheet. The concept of ethics, integrity, and confidentiality and rigor are woven through all the chapters.

 Computer Fundamentals (MSFT Office)  1 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

In this introductory course, students learn how to use Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint 2000 to create, analyze, edit, share and publish information for a variety of audiences and purposes. Through step-by-step tutorials and a project-based approach to learning, student becomes familiar with the key concepts and basic skills of today’s information technology sector.

 AP Computer Science A  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

Prerequisite: Algebra II and an introductory course in C++, Pascal, Visual Basic, Java or similar course.

Computer Science A emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development and is the equivalent of a first-semester college-level course in Computer Science. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction, but these topics are not covered to the extent that they are in Computer Science AB.

 Game Design  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

This course is for anyone who loves gaming and wants to design and build original games from scratch. Students learn how to use popular game-development software to create engaging, interactive games in a variety of styles. After learning about game genres, students learn about all aspects of the game-design process. From there, it’s on to a series of increasingly challenging hands-on projects that teach all the elements of successful game development.

 Web Design  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

This one-semester course introduces students to the mechanics and elements of web design and HTML, the concepts of planning and organizing websites, and the documentation and copyright issues associated with website design. Students engage in a variety of project-based assessments to evaluate their understanding and progress. After completing the course, students are able to understand the planning and organization of a website, the elements of design and HTML, and the copyright and fair use doctrines that apply to website creation. Students also learn how to use a WYSIWIG editor and other online tools to create a website. The NVu software package is required for this course.

 Personal Finance  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

Understanding financial management concepts is an important life skill that forms the crux of the one-semester Personal Finance course. Students learn to understand the consequences of their financial choices, from credit and debt to insurance, taxes, investments, and discretionary spending. Instructional material surveys typical personal financial needs and emphasizes the basics of budgeting. Through activities and projects with practical applications, students taking this course learn to better prepare for and secure their financial futures. Unit topics in this electivecourse include money management (personal financial planning and checking), financial security (savings, investments, and risks), credit management, risk management, and taxes and employment forms.

 Career Planning  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

In this half-credit course, students will use an informative interactive process to explore career and life options. Students begin with a thorough examination of their own interests, aptitudes, achievements, and personality styles. Potential career matches, job market information, informational interviews, and training and educational paths are examined.

 Life Skills  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

Life Skills is designed to increase student knowledge and ability in skills necessary for everyday living. The course emphasizes defining personal values, goal-setting and planning, making decisions and solving problems, evaluating information and dealing with media and peer pressure, communication and relationships, decision making, wellness and personal safety, and contributing to your community.

 Family and Consumer Science  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

In this course, students develop skills and knowledge to help them transition into adult roles within the family. They learn to make wise consumer choices, prepare nutritious meals, contribute effectively as part of a team, manage a household budget, and balance roles of work and family. They gain an appreciation for the responsibilities of family members throughout the life span and the contributions to the well-being of the family and the community.

Additional Offerings 

 AP Art History  1 credit
 Grades 11-12  N/A pds/wk

This course is designed to foster in students an understanding and knowledge of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within diverse historical and cultural contexts. Students examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures. In addition to visual analysis, this course emphasizes understanding works in context, considering such issues as patronage, gender and the functions and effects of works of art. Prior art training is not a prerequisite nor does the course cater exclusively to future Art History majors. This course was designed to meet the requirements of the Advanced Placement Art History requirements precisely.

 Art Appreciation  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

This one-semester course will introduce learners to the various forms of the visual arts, such as painting, sculpture, film, and more. Students will learn how to look at a work of art, identify and compare key characteristics in artworks, and understand the role art has played throughout history. Through hands-on activities, virtual museum tours, discussion and research, learners will develop an overall appreciation for the art they encounter in their daily lives.

 Driver’s Education  0.2 credit
 Grades 10-12  N/A pds/wk

This course is a foundation of theory for responsible driving. Emphasis is placed upon mechanics of driving, execution of driving operations and rules of safe driving. This course is the equivalent of a one-semester course.

 Health I  0.5 credit
 Grade 9  N/A pds/wk

This course concentrates on the role that lifestyles and behaviors have on an individual’s health. Students learn to take responsibility for their health by developing decision-making and problem-solving skills. Content areas include social-emotional and mental health, non-communicable diseases, communicable diseases including AIDS, nutrition and fitness, substance abuse, sexuality, and safety. The Health I (.5 credit course) has been approved to satisfy the .6 Health I credit required for graduation from Carlisle High School.

 Health II  0.2 credit
 Grade 12  N/A pds/wk

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of health issues that will impact their lives as adults. Issues will include but are not limited to fitness, nutrition, personal and consumer health and safety.

 Physical Education  0.25 credit
 Grades 9-12   N/A pds/wk

This course focuses on the fundamental components and principles of fitness. The course examines safety guidelines, proper technique, and exercise principles such as the FITT. Students will assess their current level of fitness in relation to the five components of physical fitness: flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition. Students will also learn strategies to help them begin, design, and maintain an exercise program to keep them fit for life.

 Nutrition & Wellness  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

This half credit course is an overview of good nutrition principles that are needed for human physical and mental wellness. Discussion of digestion, basic nutrients, weight management, sports and fitness, and life-span nutrition is included. Application to today’s food and eating trends, plus learning to assess for reliable nutrition information is emphasized.

 Music Appreciation  0.5 credit
 Grades 9-12  N/A pds/wk

This one semester course introduces students to the elements, instrumentation, and historical periods of music. Students will learn the significance of surroundings and time periods and how they both influenced the music of the day. Students will listen to and evaluate several types of music, and will be assessed through projects, presentations, and exams on the knowledge and understanding of music.

Revised 2015

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